These two articles caught my eye – two pieces about reframing resilience and grit. It stands to reason that those experiencing economic hardship, family challenges,  are going to have different experiences in their lives with which to frame what we we call resilience.

“We are asking students to change a belief system without changing the situation around them,” he said. It can be irresponsible and unfair to talk about grit without talking about structural challenges, he said, referring to the recent interest in interventions tied to the concepts of grit and perseverance.

So, what are those challenges? If a hypothetical classroom of 30 children were based on current demographics in the United States, this is how the students in that classroom would live: Seven would live in poverty, 11 would be non-white, six wouldn’t speak English as a first language, six wouldn’t be reared by their biological parents, one would be homeless, and six would be victims of abuse.

Howard said that exposure to trauma has a profound impact on cognitive development and academic outcomes, and schools and teachers are woefully unprepared to contend with these realities. Children dealing with traumatic situations should not been seen as pathological, he argued.

 

From The Atlantic “When Grit Isn’t Enough”

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/12/when-grit-isnt-enough/418269/

 

From the New York Times “The Profound Emptiness Of Resilience”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/06/magazine/the-profound-emptiness-of-resilience.html?_r=0